United Methodists respond to Methodist Family Health’s Get Up & Give challenge

Ruth Hunter, a member of Mount Carmel UMC Benton, with just a few of the donations collected during this year’s Get Up & Give drive. COURTESY PHOTO

Ruth Hunter, a member of Mount Carmel UMC Benton, with just a few of the donations collected during this year’s Get Up & Give drive.
COURTESY PHOTO

A mountain of backpacks, socks, underwear, notebooks, bath towels and more was donated to Methodist Family Health (MFH) by generous United Methodists across Arkansas during Lent 2015.

The contributions—including an assortment of recreational items like basketballs, footballs, soccer balls, hula hoops and board games—came in response to the sixth annual “Get Up & Give” drive. In addition, cash contributions totaling nearly $15,000 will be used for similar items needed by the children and families served by MFH. United Methodist congregations and church groups were the primary donors.

All the donations will benefit those who turn to MFH for psychiatric and behavioral healthcare.

The drive was held during the 40 days of Lent, Feb. 18 to April 2. Rather than giving up something for Lent, supporters are urged to “get up and give” something to children and families who need an extra measure of care and support. MFH distributes a wish list of requested items each year.

Donors dropped off items at one of the nine MFH counseling clinics around the state, located in Alma, Batesville, Cherokee Village, Fayetteville, Heber Springs, Hot Springs, Jonesboro, Little Rock and Magnolia.

“Arkansans are big-hearted, generous folks,” says Jane Dennis, MFH’s director of communications, who coordinated the Get Up & Give effort. “We have proof of it every year when the items the kids need and can use come flooding in. We appreciate each and every donation to Get Up & Give.”

Methodist Family Health provides care for children and families through a statewide network of inpatient, residential and outpatient programs that includes a hospital, group homes, residential treatment centers, therapeutic day treatment programs and community- and school-based counseling clinics. Founded in 1899 by Methodists in Arkansas to care for children in need, today’s MFH continues to broaden its program base and currently serves approximately 2,400 clients daily.

To learn more about MFH or how to give year-round, visit www.methodistfamily.org or call 501-906-4209.