Editor’s Corner: Who can you trust?

By Amy Forbus, Editor
 
We can’t trust anything. 
 
Except… we have to.
 
We have no choice in our daily lives but to trust. We trust that when we stand (if we can stand), we won’t fall down. That when we get out of bed in the morning, gravity is still in working order. That the water coming out of our sinks doesn’t contain harmful bacteria. Right now, I’m trusting that this chair under me won’t crumble into a heap of kindling.
 
We can’t trust anyone.
 
Except… we have to.
 
We can’t know whether someone will show up for the meeting we agreed to attend. Or if, on the way to that meeting, the other cars on the road will stay in their lanes, obeying those thin lines on the pavement as if they are truly impermeable barriers.
 
We can’t know that when we leave something, or someone, in a specific place that our return will find the situation unchanged. In fact, if it’s a person or animal you’re dealing with, there’s next to no guarantee of them staying where you left them. The question then becomes, what will you do? How will you react to what’s different the next time you turn around? (I suppose you can trust that it’s not a matter of whether something will change, but how.)
 
We trust that complete strangers won’t let us down—or we wouldn’t be able to drive to work, make a trip to the grocery store or flip a light switch on the wall.
 
We trust that our friends won’t let us down—though they undoubtedly will, at some point, in some large or small way.
 
We trust that our God won’t let us down—though we may question God when awful things happen, or even just when things don’t go quite like we’d prefer. And that’s OK. God put up with his own public execution; he can most certainly bear our questioning.
 
Life can be tough. People can be cruel. Circumstances can be unfair. Things can be just plain wrong.
 
But in the middle of it all, God is God, with a persistent, incredible love that bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.
 
Jesus is Jesus, asking the blind beggar if he wants to be well. And asking whiny little me the same question.
 
And the Holy Spirit is the Holy Spirit, blowing and flowing who-knows-where, blessing our lives in ways we may never see.
 
We can trust in that knowledge.
 
And thank God for that.
 
To reach me, send an email message to aforbus@arumc.org.